Project Stella Maris

stella_marisAs you approach the main entry of this church you are greeted with a stunning image printed on glass of “Madonna and Child” by Giovan Battista Salvi, “Il Sassoferrato”.

Madonna and Child

ColourLite Image digital ceramic glass printing by G.James offered the architect a cost effective and long term durable solution, creating a signature dimension.

“The image of the Madonna and Child is all embracing as we enter the front door of Stella Maris Catholic Church.  This age old image draws us like the Child to His mother. The curtain walls bring light and shade to the sanitary.  The two columns of glass are a symbol of water.  Water is symbolic of our Christian faith.”
– Sonya Slater, Stella Maris Catholic Church

©SBPhoto_Stella Maris Church _025“The original concept was achieved and that was the building was to be a building within the park and the park within the building. We were able to produce large pieces of glass which had high resolution that has longevity and is easy to maintain.”
– Lee & Sandra Dunne, Architect

“G.James assisted greatly at the design stage of this project. This made the process of ordering and supply of the products so much easier, with our client being thrilled with the final product.”
– Dave Stewart, NGA

Location Broadbeach, Gold Coast, QLD
Glass GJ ColourLite Image 13.52 mm

Heat Strengthened Laminate

GJ ColourLite Graphic 13.52 mm

Heat Strengthened Laminate

Architect Patrick McGuinness and Lee Dunne, Architects. Sandra Dunne, Interior Designer
Builder Stokes Wheeler
Glazier NGA
Photographer Scott Burrows

Next Generation ColourLite Technology

Cardboard CathedralG.James Glass & Aluminium has recently enhanced its ColourLite ceramic printed glass range and capability with investment in the next generation ceramic on-glass printing technology. This process is renowned internationally as one of the world’s leading digital on-glass printing systems.

Australian architects and designers now have access to a new world of high-definition, full colour glass printing capabilities, including photo-realistic images that will redefine the role of printed glass as a design showpiece for façades, feature walls, interior fit outs, signage and other architectural highlights.

On-glass digital ceramic printing differs from other printed glass technologies in its vivid richness, hardiness and imaging flexibility. The digital ceramic inks are made from microscopic glass particles and inorganic pigments that are fused to the surface of glass through the glass furnacing process. The result is an extremely durable product that is highly resistant to fading. ColourLite ceramic printed glass is a truly robust imaging system with the capacity to handle the most expressive, forceful design ideas.

Lewis Saragossi, Managing Director and Chairman of G.James, says as a local manufacturer, he and his team are delighted to introduce new ColourLite capabilities to Australian architects and designers.

“We are very excited to add this new technology to our extensive product line and offerings,” he says. “We have spent a great deal of time evaluating the various technology options to find the one that would best match the needs and demands of the Australian market as well as current and future design trends. Our customers are impressed with the short lead time, available from our three local manufacturing facilities in Melbourne, Sydney and Brisbane.”

ColourLite Examples

This new imaging software allows designers to accurately portray single images over multiple glass panels, and there is flexibility to present different designs. For example, the printing system allows for a continuous design to cover the full extent of a building façade for maximum impact. This includes the possible use of full perforated imaging to the vision panels. The unique digital system caters for either individual or multiple panel printing without the excessive cost and limitations of a silk screen.


Whats New?

  • High definition 720dpi printing
  • Glass thickness from 4mm to 19mm
  • Automatic inline pre mix colour range
  • Sizes from 300 x200mm to 4000 x 2300mm

1. Cardboard Cathedral Christchurch New Zealand Image supplied by Dip-Tech Photography by Bridgit Anderson 2. Fletcher Hotel Amsterdam, Holland Image supplied by Dip-Tech 3. G.James Glass & Aluminium Cairns, Australia Photography by Mark McCormack

Soul Apartments, Surfers Paradise

Soul tower, Surfers Paradise - Balustrades, sliding doors and fixed windowsSoul Apartments were constructed at an exclusive location by the water at the heart of Surfers Paradise on the Gold Coast. The tower reaches 77 storeys, including 2 levels of commercial premises at the base, one level of leisure facilities for the resident population and the tower above devoted to lifestyle apartments.

The 243m high building was designed by DBI Design PL and built by Grocon, under the direction of the Juniper Group.  The tower is situated at the end of Cavill Avenue – the popular shopping strip at Surfers Paradise. G.James Glass & Aluminium won the contract to supply the design, fabrication and installation of the glazing – including windows, doors, louvres, curtain wall, sun blades and balustrades.

The Residential Tower Facade

The residential tower consists of 288 apartments with a variety of glazing types – a curtain wall face, balconies with sliding doors and windows. The sheer curtain wall façade was produced using the 650 Series glazing system, and fitted between the concrete support columns. Sky blue laminated glass contrasts well with the white columns in the marine setting.  The majority of the project’s extrusions were powder coated (finished) in Eternity Steel – a dark finish that blended into the shadow lines.

The balcony glazing utilizes the 445 Series sliding doors, 450 Series fixed windows and 415 Series louvres. The balustrading for the tower was done with 571 Series. At the top of the building, the shape of the balustrade glass was raked from level 60 and above to support the curved aspect. The raked balustrades required special layouts and bracketry specific to the level they are installed on to make the curve regular.

The tower colour scheme contrasts vivid blue sections with predominantly white areas.  The blue areas were created using sky blue glass, the same as the sheer wall. The white areas use a Cool Grey glass. The Balustrades match the colour coding of the area they fall in, and intensify the look with a reflective coating.

Sun blades are installed on the upper portion of the tower.  The south face at the sub penthouse level has large angular alpolic blades fitted to the Juliet balconies, creating a visual feature and angled to block harsh glare.

Commercial Levels

On the lower commercial levels, 3 floors high, G.James supplied the ceramic printed toughened glass (installed by others) and balustrading. The ceramic printed toughened glass for the awnings has a creeping fern pattern.  The 571 Series balustrades for the first 3 floors were internal and external, and include the the shopping plaza. 

QuickAlly Access

QuickAlly Access Solutions (a G.James business) supplied scaffolding to replace damaged balustrade, recently.  The affected glazing occured on level 6 and level 75.  Both balustrade glazing occur on balconies with limited space to provide a cantilever, so solutions were suggested and engineered to find the best approach. Ladder beams and other Systems Scaffold products were used for a suspended platform to provide safe access to the high risk heights.

The Effect

The glazing on this project makes a stunning impression from inside and out, and could not be accomplished without a high level of design and coordination. It was a great opportunity to contribute to an iconic building.

Capturing Light in an Urban Space

natural light -elev - east This residence has recently been constructed in one of the laneways of Fortitude Valley, just outside the Brisbane CBD in Queensland. Using smart orientation and well designed glazing features, a light and airy modern house has been constructed.

This urban block with an area of about 200m², fits a house with an approximate 90m² footprint. The architect, Andrew Wiley proposed a house that is naturally lit with a spacious feel in this confined perimeter. This was done working with interior designer Benta Wiley, to maximise the effect of light play on the artworks and sculptures intended for the house. The builder, Nick Chatburn & Co, worked in conjunction with G.James Glass & Aluminium to provide the glazing for the project.


There are two façades taking advantage of open areas outside to maximise views and natural sunlight entering the 3 storey building. In particular the east elevation has a glass wall the height of the building.  This wall provides naturally light to an atrium that every room in the house opens into. Glass fins support the expanse of frameless glazing. The effect of this light well gives the house a spacious feel, enhancing the flow and communication between living spaces.

Blue glass intensifies the colouration of the sky outside – used in the atrium and sliding door/windows on the north and east faces. These large windows are made from sliding doors that enable 2100 high windows.  As a safety barrier, glass balustrade is installed to the interior. This maximises the amount of light that flows into these rooms.

Shutters sit on the outside of these windows, promote a modern feel to the houses exterior.  Internally the shutters provide an insulative shade barrier, blocking the harshest rays yet letting light filter through the gaps and cooling air that flows between them. The detailing for these doors was developed at G.James – they sit on a large structural angle that is fixed to the outside of the building to give them the floating appearance.

Natural Light Features

Natural light penetrates from one side of the house to the other with the use of glass internal doors, slit windows strategically positioned to the south and west faces, and glass roof lights. There are two of these with opaque glass on the ground level that give the office and laundry a bright lift.

The third glazed sky light is a glass canopy located at the top of the stairs, leading onto the roof. An opening at the top of a space such as the atrium draws rising hot air up and out, naturally cooling the entire house and enhancing air flow through it. The glass canopy leads to a stunning outdoor area overlooking the neighbourhood, made of self cleaning glass.  Being completely see through, it doesn’t create a visual barrier in the centre of this space, but divides the different areas up for their individual uses.

Bringing the Best of the Outdoors Inside

The entire house incorporates the enjoyment of being able to make the most of the Queensland outdoors and lifestyle – starting as you enter the house.  The front door to the property is through a wide frameless glass door.  This electronically operated pivot door opens into what seems like a courtyard complete with a well planted pond. Over the pond is another frameless sliding door operated automatically, allowing lush green plant life outside to become part of the welcoming committee. This space is in fact the inside of the atrium.

Interior Inspiration

The house is an inspiration, and a beautiful example of what can be achieved with limited space in a medium density urban area.

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Products by G.James

  • Entry – toughened clear glass into 475 series surround framing with frameless pivot door
  • Atrium – Structurally glazed laminated blue glass with fins into 450 series surround framing. (External blind by builder)
  • Hinged Internal and Back Doors – Toughened glass frameless doors into 475 series framing and glass channel hydraulic hinges.
  • Auto Sliding over fish pond – Toughened glass frameless door with 475 series glass channel surround frame.
  • Dining Window – 131 series offset sliding window, 3.6m long with a 1.2m sash.
  • Sliding window / doors – 245 series commercial sliders with blue laminated glass. Sliding shutters are made from G.James extrusions by a third party, and incorporated into the 245 sliding track. The glazing sits on large angle bracketry on the external face of the building to give it the seamless appearance.
  • Down stairs sky lights – white translucent glass structurally glazed to stainless steel pressings.
  • Glass roof / canopy – Sides are Low E  heat strengthened laminate on Stainless steel stand off.  Roof top glazing is self cleaning, Low E heat strengthened  laminate with polished SS pressings.
  • Fixed glazing – white translucent glass in 450 series framing.
  • 3 Shower screens – frameless shower glazing – one of each style -bay window, single shower screen panel and square base.
  • Extrusions finished in a stone grey powder coat.

Glass By Definition – Part 1

Glass Bike - Glass Definitions - G.James Glass and AluminiumThis article will assist in demystifying the types of architectural glass used in buildings. The names we use for the different glass types are generally attributed to some part of the manufacturing process. In part one of this two part series, we look at basic glass products to highly processed glazing options.

Some History on Architectural Glass

Since clear glass was being first made in about 100 CE, in Alexandria, the Romans began using it architecturally. This began the long list of manufacturing methods and specialised names attributed to the different types of processes – Broad sheet, Crown, Polished Plate, the list goes on. In 1848, a crude form of float glass was patented by inventor Henry Bessemer by pouring glass onto liquid tin, but it was very expensive. It wasn’t until 1959 that this idea for float glass was made in a practical method – a discovery by Sir Alistair Pilkington that now dominates the worldwide commercial production of architectural glass products.

Basic Float Glass Products

The differences between the basic glass types are formed in the glass making “float process”. Soda, lime and silica as well as broken glass called cullet are the major components used in the manufacture of glass. These components are mixed into a batch before being heated to approx. 1500°C in a furnace. The molten glass is then floated on a “tin bath” –  a layer of molten tin.   As the glass begins to cool it solidifies and is drawn out of the float tank in one continuous ribbon.  The glass enters the annealing or cooling lehr – it is the controlled cooling (annealing) of the glass that allows it to be cut and further processed.

Float Glass or Annealed Glass

These terms are interchangeable and refer to the respective glass manufacturing processes.  They describe glass in its basic form, before secondary manufacture.  In a general sense, Annealed Glass is used when comparing heat treated glass to non heat treated glass.

Clear Glass

Clear Glass is a piece of transparent float glass, typically uncoloured.

Tinted Glass

Tints are glass with metal oxides added to give it a specific hue. The tint or colouration is through the body of the glass and therefore darkens with an increase in thickness.  Apart from aesthetics, tinted glass is used for reducing heat gain through the glazing system. Common tints include green, blue, grey and bronze.

Super Tints

Super Tints are designed to reduce heat gain while allowing the maximum amount of light through making it a performance product. The heat absorbing qualities also make them prone to thermal stress (caused by temperature difference), and a thermal safety assessment is recommended to determine if heat treating is required (see Secondary Manufacture below). Colours include Azuria, Super Green and Super Blue.

On Line Coated Glass

Sometimes referred to as pyrolytic glass, metallic oxides are deposited onto the glass surface in the float glass tank during manufacture. These coatings can increase the performance of the glass with a range of reflective and low E products available. They are extremely hard and durable, and can be used on their own or heat treated without affecting the coating.

Low Iron Glass

The green colouration in glass is due to the iron content found in silica or sand. Low Iron Glass has less than 1/10th of the iron content of standard glass and are considered ultra clear. Low Iron Glass is ideal for use in display cases, painted glass applications like splash backs or in areas where high clarity is required.

Deli Bend or Curved Glass (Annealed)

Glass can be curved as float, by laying the glass over a mould before annealing begins. It is commonly used to make butcher or delicatessen benches (hence the name), furniture and curved architectural glass that is to be laminated.

Processed Glass

Glass requires finishing before it can be used in location, or sent for secondary manufacture. Commonly, this includes cutting to size, and edging, but there are many alternatives in both these fields.


Almost all glass will require cutting to the job size requirements, but this process also includes cuts to produce as irregular shapes, such as raked windows, shower screens with cut outs for fittings, glass walls needing spider fittings and custom profiling.

  • Various regular and irregular shapes required are cut with a CNC machine.
  • V Grooved cuts in the face of glass, or brilliant cut, provides an alternate decorative finish.
  • Drilling – Holes from 5mm to 100mm can be drilled into the glass, but the hole diameter must be equal to or greater than the glass thickness. Holes can include a countersunk rim. The hole edging has a ground finish.
  • Shaping – glass can be cut at special shapes or profiles to custom requirements.

There are edge clearances that are relative to the glass thickness for the size and location of cut outs and holes drilled into a sheet of glass. Please contact your manufacturer for exact positioning limitations.


Edging provides a range of options for the perimeter of the glass to suit its application. Different edges are applied for ease of installation, to assist with further processing or to achieve a look.  One common process is arrissing – a term used to describe the method used to grind the sharp edges of glass to make them safer to handle.

  • Plain cut glass, is called Clean Cut
  • Glass to be toughened requires Rough Arris edge work – arrissed edges with a rough ground finish.
  • Smooth Arris is similar to the rough arris, but with a smoother finish to the edge.
  • Flat Grind or Flat Smooth edges are machined smooth edges suitable for silicone butt jointed applications.
  • Flat Polished is the neatest finish used for exposed edges of glass.
  • Mitred Glass has a 45 degree bevel on one side with an edge finish suitable for mitred silicone butt joints.
  • Round and Polished edge work gives the glass a curved edge for exposed perimeters.

Secondary Manufacture

Secondary Manufacture takes the various types of float glass and changes the properties in a range of production processes.

Heat Treated Glass

A general term used to describe the process of further strengthening or testing glass in a second heating and cooling process. Its is the way or speed in which the glass is cooled gives the glass stronger properties, and length of heating to test the glass.

Heat Strengthened Glass

Heat strengthening is a treatment of glass that induces a high compression layer on the surface.  This is done by cooling the reheated glass at a specific rate. This process makes glass twice as strong as annealed glass, although it is not considered safety glass.

Toughened or Tempered Glass

Toughening glass also induces a high compression layer in a similar process to heat strengthened glass. To toughen the glass, the heated glass is cooled very quickly. This makes it 4 to 5 times stronger than annealed glass of the same thickness. Certain thicknesses are considered A grade safety glass – refer to standard AS 1288.

Heat Soaked Glass

Toughened glass can spontaneously shatter due to small imperfections in glass called Nickel Sulphide inclusions. They are rare, but undetectable, and so, to ensure the glass will retain its form, heat soak testing is done. The glass is heated for a period of time which induces the Nickel Sulphide inclusions to rupture if they are present.  Glass that passes the test, has a markedly reduced possibility of failure once in location.

Curved Glass (toughened)

Curved Glass that requires toughening is bent in the toughening process.  A series of rams fold the glass to the desired shape. Tighter corners and soft curves are achievable.

Off Line Coating

High performance glass has a coating applied to its surface. Different looks can also be achieved with colour and reflectivity. Although large steps in technology over the last couple of years have increased the durability of off line coatings, some are quite delicate, and cannot be heat treated.  Others need to be used in an IGU, so the coated side of the glass is sealed from the elements and physical damage.

Laminated Glass

Laminates are made of two or more pieces of glass permanently bonded together with interlayers. Interlayers are made up of various materials to give the completed glass additional properties, for example, acoustic, colour and UV eliminating. Laminated glass is considered A grade safety glass.


IGUs consist of two panels of glass fitted together with a hermetically sealed air space in between to provide an insulative layer protecting against thermal and acoustic issues. The air in the gap is dried to prevent condensation issues.

Other common glass terms

The following terms are not processes done to manufacture glass, but are descriptions of how they are classed, rated and used.

Double Glazing

Double glazing is when two pieces of glass are used with an air gap in between. Special framing suites with glazing pockets front and back are considered double glazed, as are jockey sashes and IGUs.

Monolithic Glass

Monolithic glass is a single pane of glass as opposed to laminated, double glazed or insulated glass units.

Safety Glass

Safety glass is processed glass that is manufactured to satisfy the requirements of AS/NZS 2208 for safety glazing. Laminated and toughened glass are rated Grade A. Wired glass is rated Grade B.

Security Glass

Security Glass is designed to repel violent attack. They are usually combinations of laminated glass that incorporate toughened or polycarbonate combinations. They are not necessarily considered Safety Glass.

Part two to be released in November –

I hope you found these descriptions useful. In part two of this article, thermal glazing terms and properties will be discussed. It will include the terms used to measure and describe performance, what basis the measurements are made from and a comparison of data commonly used – glass only vs whole of window data.

Gasworks – A Modern Development with a Heritage Heart

Gasworks building developmentOngoing development of a historical site located at Newstead (Brisbane), sees it transforming in stages to a new mixed use precinct. The name derives from the sites original use – the gasworks, and part of the project is to protect the heritage listed gasometer located prominently amid the gasworks buildings.

Originally built in 1863, the gasometer once stored gas in a large bladder contained within its frame work.  The Gasometer has been fully restored ensuring the ornate pinnacles and lace work beams stand as equal alongside its newly constructed neighbours.  It creates a unique contrast set amidst the strong lines and bold shapes of the modern architectural features of the Gasworks building development.

Designed by the same team that worked on the adjacent Energex building – Architect Cox Rayner and builders FKP, the buildings in this phase of construction comprise of Building A on Skyring Terrace (five storeys) and Building E on Longland St (three storeys).

G.James Role

G.James Glass and Aluminium supplied and installed glazing facades, doors, windows and some extruded sun hoods. Building A has a proposed 5 star green star rating – so energy efficiency, acoustics and air infiltration were important design factors. As such, products with proven test results were selected for use.

Building A

Building A comprises ground floor shop front retail with four upper levels of offices. The offices utilise the flush glazed 651 series glazed with IGUs made up of green glass with a low E coating for energy efficiency, a 12mm air space, and 6mm clear glass internally. This also assisted in achieving a better acoustic rating.  Spandrel panels were made with a green ceramic painted surface – a premium spandrel glass option  that maintains the look set by the vision area.

Building E

Building E was a combination of two levels of residential apartments along Longland Street, two levels of office space along the breeze way between the buildings, and a retail shop front precinct on the ground level. The offices in building E utilize the 650 series, also flush glazed, but to accommodate 11.52mm laminated glass. The glass has a low E coating and the same colour, but didn’t require the same level of acoustic rating or energy efficiency. The office glazing also incorporated architectural features such as glass fins for extra strength and sun hoods for protection.

The residential apartments use a range of glazing styles. Fixed framing used the 650 series system with 265  series awning windows spaced across the facade. Balconies feature four side supported 550 series balustrades with access through 445 series sliding doors.

Shopfront Design Problem

The retail areas required a centrally glazed pocket, but the opening size and wind loads exceeded the constraints of the current system.  As many architects are looking for options to make windows larger, the decision was made to replace the current aluminium vertical members, the mullions, with a stiffer option. The new design also incorporated the ability to strengthen it further. This new addition to the G.James range is used extensively throughout the Gasworks project.

Practically Completed

Practical completion was achieved on the 3rd August, 2013, however there are still minor works, interior fit outs and landscape work under way.  Building E has been designed so a residential tower can be constructed above it in the future.

The Gasworks project is an aesthetic feast, and well worth a look if you are in the area. Please consult the interactive map project to get the location and a summary of the project information.

Interactive Map: Building Brisbane

Brisbane construction projects by G.James Glass & Aluminium

Brisbane, being the location of our Head Office, sees many fine examples of G.James workmanship.   Here, we outline some of the biggest and best projects undertaken to showcase our capabilities in recent times.

The interactive map is designed so you can take a tour of some of our most recent and notable works.  Either at your desk looking out a CBD window, taking a stroll around town, and driving past a building or through an area you have always wanted to know more about.


G.James has contributed widely to what Brisbane looks like today.   There are buildings that have added to Brisbane’s sky line and to the diversity of looks and uses that are designed for the various parts of this fair city.  On some buildings, there are unique features that make them distinctive.  For example –

  • the ribbons of M&A,
  • the splash of red across the Australian Federal Police building,
  • the glass wall of Sir Samuel Griffith Centre,
  • the towering Aurora and Riparian plaza.

There are many buildings that have achieved the coveted green star energy efficient design,  some interesting artwork on glass designed by local artists – its worth a visit to the Anthropology Museum at UQ to see the ceramic printed window alone. Some of the buildings have specialised glass systems to suit the works being done, like the Translational Research Institute and the ABC headquarters.

There are projects that have altered the face of a tired old façade, so if you look at an old image of QIMR, you won’t recognize it.  And then theres the Suncorp Stadium which gives you a glimpse inside a place where state pride and competition is on the line.

The Interactive Map

The map is aimed to give you a glimpse into the depth the G.James knowledge base and provide an overview of the types of works that G.James is capable of.  It highlights projects done by various departments in the company, including:

  • Commercial departments
  • Residential departments
  • Gossi park and street furniture
  • Glass department

You can have a look at the map and plan out a scenic drive, or target specific jobs, or just get an idea of what we have produced, in your area.  As you can imagine, there are too many jobs to make this an all-inclusive list, but we aimed to include a range of jobs reflecting different styles and features.

A brief dossier on the project is included – a photo of what to look for, basic job data and links to further information on the project.  G.James can help you with any further information required for the jobs represented.

Explore Here…

Enjoy the exploration, and keep an eye on this space. Other areas will be released as our database of projects rolls out – Sydney, Melbourne, the Gold Coast, as well as other areas to be where you can find G.James fingerprints…

Until then, enjoy this insight into the River City.


 G.James Projects

 Gossi Designs

Free upgrade to blue or green tinted glass

Green Tinted Glass

Green Tinted Glass

Special Offer saving you a minimum of $500*

FREE Upgrade to Blue or Green Tinted Glass**

  • Reduces the sun’s energy entering through your windows by 39%
  • Adds value to your home
  • Colour that never fades
  • Reduced glare

Take advantage of this offer while stocks last!

* On an average size house. Offer available to all buyers.
**Offer applies to Green and Blue Glass installed in new homes and renovations only. Offer valid while stocks last.

Tinted Glass solar radiation illustration

Fig 1. Tinted Glass solar radiation

What is Tinted Glass & How is it made?

Body tinted glass is produced by adding small quantities of metal oxides to the normal clear glass mix during manufacturing of the float glass. The addition of the colours does not affect the basic properties of the glass and the tint will not fade or break down over time.

Solar Heat Reduction

The primary benefit of tinted glass is its ability to reduce the amount of solar energy from the sun entering the home. ( see Fig.1) . Of the 100% of the incident ray from the sun which strikes the glass approximately 47% of this energy is absorbed. A lower Solar Heat Gain improves the comfort within the home and also assists to reduce cooling costs.

Glare Reduction

Standard 4mm clear glass has a visible light transmittance of 89%, both Green & Blue tinted glass offer a glare reduction while still allowing adequate amounts of light to enter the home.

Blue Tinted Glass

Blue Tinted Glass

Daytime Privacy

The reduced visible light transmittance will assist in providing a level of privacy during daylight hours

Aesthetic Appeal

Adding tinted glass to windows of any home improves its aesthetic appeal also adding style and value to your home.

Technical Info (Glass only)

5mm Blue 6mm Green
Visible light transmittance 61% 77%
Visible light Reflectance 7% 7%
Solar Heat Gain Coefficient 0.61 0.61
U Value (W/m2C) 5.8 5.8

Claim this offer

To claim this offer contact your nearest branch and ask for your free upgrade to tinted glass.

Project update: Icon Ipswich

Aerial view of Icon IpswichThe Ipswich City Heart building is the first stage of developer Leighton Properties‘ $1 billion Icon Ipswich project. Designed by Cox Architecture, it is a 42m high, nine-storey office tower which comprises 15,000 square metres (sqm) of commercial space together with 750sqm of ground floor retail and 200 car parks. The building is an A-Grade commercial development, and is targeting a 5 Star Green Star and a 4.5 Star NABERS rating. Nearly all of the office space in the building has been leased to the Queensland government for a term of 15 years. Construction on the project is being overseen by Hutchinson Builders

G.James’ Role

G.James has been engaged to supply and install window wall and curtain wall along the height of the building. G.James is also providing structural glazing to the basement, ground and upper ground floors, as well as a structurally glazed roof-lite to level 1.

Visual Mockup

Prior to starting on site, G.James constructed a visual mockup to provide a full-scale representation of the colour selection as designed for the building. The mockup allowed colour selections to be seen in proper context, under natural lighting, to ensure the building gives the desired visual effect.

The Façade

G.James is using the 546 series system with black anodised framing for the window wall on the western façade with independent vertical sunshades installed between structural slabs. These vertical fins are in 5 special anodised colours (listed below) which are selectively positioned on each floor to create a pattern.

  • Sapphire Matte Tornado Red
  • G.James Residential Bronze
  • AAF Maroochy Sand
  • G.James Champagne Bronze
  • G.James Matte Gold

G.James is using our 546 series system with black anodised framing for the curtain wall to the eastern façade, incorporating gold metallic Alpolic projections and black anodised horizontal sunblades.

The southern and northern faces of the building are a mixture of both window wall and curtain wall fully encapsulating the floors.

The vision glass used in the building is made up of Solarplus DLE55 Low-E glass on green, configured in argon filled IG Units.

The shadow boxes are made up of 6mm green heat-strengthened glass, using 5 different colours (listed below) of backing sheet selectively positioned on each floor to create a pattern.

  • Dulux PVF2 Mars Red
  • Dulux PVF2 Gold Dust
  • Dulux PVF2 Brassed Off
  • Dulux PVF2 Wax Way
  • Dulux PVF2 Blonde Girl

PVF2 paints have an excellent service life and are highly resistant to fading. These properties make PVF2 finishes a low maintenance finish of choice for large projects.

Current Status

G.James started site installation in late January, and will continue until approximately May. Overall, construction on the building is progressing well, the concrete structure of the building has been completed and  practical completion is expected to be third quarter of 2013.

Seeing Red

Griffith Conservatorium Balustrade

Griffith Conservatorium Balustrade

Walking along Grey Street at Brisbane’s Southbank, you may notice the red glass balustrade at the back of the Griffith University Conservatorium.

G.James supplied the striking red glass to Queensland Glass who glazed the job. This eye-catching project conforms with the “Griffith University Red” colour scheme and is sure to generate a lot of attention.


The Vanceva Colour System uses vibrant coloured safety interlayers to create coloured glass laminates. It has a palette of 14 base colours which can be mixed and matched to provide over 1000 different colour options. Vanceva is a product of Solutia Inc and G.James is one of two authorised manufacturers in Australia and New Zealand.

G.James can supply a wide range of Vanceva coloured glass for your project. Contact G.James Glass Sales on (07) 3877 2866. Or visit Our contact page for full details.