Free upgrade to blue or green tinted glass

Green Tinted Glass

Green Tinted Glass

Special Offer saving you a minimum of $500*

FREE Upgrade to Blue or Green Tinted Glass**

  • Reduces the sun’s energy entering through your windows by 39%
  • Adds value to your home
  • Colour that never fades
  • Reduced glare

Take advantage of this offer while stocks last!

* On an average size house. Offer available to all buyers.
**Offer applies to Green and Blue Glass installed in new homes and renovations only. Offer valid while stocks last.

Tinted Glass solar radiation illustration

Fig 1. Tinted Glass solar radiation

What is Tinted Glass & How is it made?

Body tinted glass is produced by adding small quantities of metal oxides to the normal clear glass mix during manufacturing of the float glass. The addition of the colours does not affect the basic properties of the glass and the tint will not fade or break down over time.

Solar Heat Reduction

The primary benefit of tinted glass is its ability to reduce the amount of solar energy from the sun entering the home. ( see Fig.1) . Of the 100% of the incident ray from the sun which strikes the glass approximately 47% of this energy is absorbed. A lower Solar Heat Gain improves the comfort within the home and also assists to reduce cooling costs.

Glare Reduction

Standard 4mm clear glass has a visible light transmittance of 89%, both Green & Blue tinted glass offer a glare reduction while still allowing adequate amounts of light to enter the home.

Blue Tinted Glass

Blue Tinted Glass

Daytime Privacy

The reduced visible light transmittance will assist in providing a level of privacy during daylight hours

Aesthetic Appeal

Adding tinted glass to windows of any home improves its aesthetic appeal also adding style and value to your home.

Technical Info (Glass only)

5mm Blue 6mm Green
Visible light transmittance 61% 77%
Visible light Reflectance 7% 7%
Solar Heat Gain Coefficient 0.61 0.61
U Value (W/m2C) 5.8 5.8

Claim this offer

To claim this offer contact your nearest branch and ask for your free upgrade to tinted glass.

The Glass House – Barossa Valley

Glass House Barossa

Looking out over the hills of the Barossa Valley is this unique home affectionately labelled  ‘the Glass House’. Designed by leading Adelaide architect Max Pritchard the house is unusually linear in design – it is 60 metres in length but only a single room wide in the main living areas. To optimise space, a long hallway runs along one side connecting the bedrooms and the bathrooms.

Perched on the highest point of the block and with a lengthy northern elevation, this house naturally takes advantage of the warmth and light provided by the sun, particularly during the winter months, whilst allowing the owners to enjoy sweeping views of the valley below.

The skillion roof of the building makes a striking statement as it is a continuous plane along the length of the entire home. The house itself sits on a number of levels conforming to the slope of the land. These level changes are accommodated by a timber ramp in the connecting hall.

The home featured in the third season of the ‘Grand Designs Australia’ television show late last year.

Details

G.James Glass & Aluminium – Adelaide were contracted to supply and install the approximately 180m² of windows and doors.  All the aluminium joinery was finished in Clear Anodised and glazed with 24mm insulated glass units (IGU’s) with required compliance to a Bushfire Attack Level (BAL) of 12.5. Given the chilly winters in South Australia and the large area of windows and doors, double glazing was the ideal selection as it helps to minimise heat loss – maintaining a comfortable environment within the home. The clever design of the house allows the sun’s heat to penetrate deep into the home during winter – while large eaves shade the glazing during the hot summer months.

There are a number of large fixed windows in the home.  Due to their size, two of our commercial framing systems were used for these windows – front glazed 451 Series framing and 651 Series double framing.

The southern elevation contains ten windows designed as a trapezoidal shape to fit with the gentle taper of the building. These windows have a casement attached, which is also trapezoidal. It was a challenge to create these unusually shaped windows at exactly the right angle, but this was achieved at the first attempt.

All sliding doors in the home were G.James high performance 445-100 Series, fitted with Crimsafe security screens. There are also a number of louvre windows, using 102mm & 152mm louvre blades.

Find out more

G.James have the expertise to help turn your dream home into reality. Our vast experience enables us to take on unusual or complicated jobs and our Australian manufacturing ensures that all your new home is created with highest quality windows and doors. For more information about what we can do for you, have a chat with the friendly staff at to your local G.James branch.

Project Update – Circa Nundah

Circa Nundah

Circa Nundah is a $270 million urban renewal project from developer Property Solutions. Circa Nundah is located on a 2.5 hectare site in Nundah, Brisbane. Masterplanned by Arkhefield, the site will eventually contain three 9 storey residential buildings and an eight storey commercial building. The commercial building – Circa CT1, was completed towards the end of 2012, and work is drawing to a finish on the first residential building, Circa One.

Circa One comprises 42 one-bedroom and 42 two-bedroom apartments, 490m² of ground-level retail space, a residents’ recreation room, manager’s office and two levels of secure basement parking. Apartments generally range from 63 to 101m², with large corner garden terrace units of up to 133m². Construction on Circa Nundah Village is being carried out by Hutchinson Builders.

G.James’ Role

Circa Nundah required both G.James’ Commercial Contracting and Eagle Farm Residential Divisions to join forces to complete the scope of works.

This project called for the supply and installation of G.James’ 165 Series sliding windows, 265 Series awning windows, 445 sliding doors and 475 Series shopfront / fixed windows.

All aluminium framing was extruded and powder coated in-house and finished in Precious Pewter Pearl.

More to come

G.James have enjoyed a close working relationship with Hutchinson Builders over the course of this project. Plans for the next residential building on the site – Circa Dos, were unveiled last year, and construction is just beginning. For further information about this project or our residential solutions please contact the G.James Eagle Farm Branch on (07) 3877 2844 or via email at hilite@gjames.com.au.

Project Update: Sir Samuel Griffith Centre

Installing the glass screen

The Sir Samuel Griffith Centre (SSGC) is a $40 million world class building currently under construction at Griffith University’s Nathan campus. The building was designed by Cox Architecture and construction is being overseen by Watpac. The facility will have 4000m² of usable floor area across six levels, and will house approximately 60 academic/research staff and a number of support staff. It will also provide a number of lecture theatres, seminar rooms and collaborative areas. The SSGC has been awarded a coveted 6-star green rating by the Green Building Council of Australia (GBCA), and will be Australia’s first off-grid, self-powering teaching and research facility. The building will cement Griffith University’s reputation as a leader in Environmental Science.

Building FeaturesThe large glazed screen

To achieve its 6 star green rating, the SSGC has a number of energy efficient features. The need for artificial lighting has been reduced by large windows, few internal walls, and glass partitions. The dominant feature of the building is the large glazed screen that makes up one side of the façade. Combined with photovoltaic cells on the roof and a state of the art battery & hydrogen energy storage system the building will be self-powered.

Photovoltaic cells will convert sunlight into electricity for use during the day, as well as providing additional storage in batteries, and also through the electrolytic production of hydrogen. The hydrogen is then stored in a stable form as metal hydrides. Battery storage will be used primarily for overnight cooling of water to run the air conditioning systems and hydrogen to supply fuels cells for electricity production on cloudy days. A digital electronic energy management system will maximise the efficiency of energy usage.

G.James’ Role

G.James were engaged to supply, install and glaze six levels of aluminium windows, doors and louvres, as well as the special glass screen. The windows and doors feature energy-efficient low E coated insulated glass units. Frames on the window and door systems have been finished with commercial bronze and matte gold anodising. Matte gold powdercoat was also used to finish some items such as glass screen brackets.

Glazed Screen

The glazed screen features large panels of special clear heat-strengthened laminated glass. The glass panels are 2171×3280 mm or 2171×3540 mm in size and range in thickness from 17.5-21.5mm. In total the glass screen utilises 166 square metres of glass. The screen is supported by a fabricated “spider” steel frame. G.James designed brackets especially for this project to fix the glass to the steel supports.

ChallengesInstalling glass to the screen.

G.James commenced work on site in November 2012 and expects to be finished in May this year. The installation of the glazed screen has required significant manpower and expertise. The installation of the glass to the screen necessitated two cranes with drivers and dogmen, four booms, two special glass suckers, four abseils, eight glaziers, ropes, slings, glass bremners. The geometry of the screen also required glass panels to be installed at angles – no easy task with the glass panels weighing in at several hundred kilograms apiece. Additionally significant labour was required offsite preparing and organising the materials ready for install.

The wet and unpleasant weather Brisbane has experienced over the last few months has presented additional complications, with wind and rain causing work stoppages. Road closures and equipment failure were also challenges G.James had to overcome during the install. The fixers and crews who worked on this project deserve praise for their great work on a difficult assignment.

Looking Ahead

The building is expected to be completed in June this year, G.James is looking forward to see this exciting building open.

Project Update: Mackay Base Hospital

Mackay Base HospitalThe redevelopment of Mackay Base Hospital is a $405 million project designed to meet the needs of the growing Mackay area. The project was designed by Architects Woods Bagot, in association with Sanders Turner Ellick Architects of Mackay. Construction on the project has been overseen by Baulderstone. The redevelopment project is being undertaken for Queensland Health.

About the project and construction

The redevelopment has been divided into three stages of construction. The first stage commenced in 2009 and mostly consisted of early site works. The second stage was completed towards the end of last year and included works on buildings E,F,G,H,J and Q.Mackay Base Hospital Aerial Photo

G.James’ work on the project so far has encompassed the supply and install of a range of glazing and façade products. Our 651 series windows were used throughout the project – the majority of those used contained jockey sashes and Venetian blinds. We also supplied a large number of fixed louvre systems and acoustic louvres. Around a dozen automatic doors were also supplied and installed. There were a number of factors which affected the choice of products for this project, the most notable were section J energy efficiency requirements, acoustic requirements, and the ability to withstand cyclonic wind loads. In light of these requirements our 651 window system, 415 series fixed louvres, 775 series sunshades, and 150 strip window system were chosen for use.

G.James supplied various types of cladding for the project including Alucobond, Nailstrip and Mini Corry. G.James also supplied feature shrouds, sunshades, batten screens and perforated sunscreens in various colours and finishes – though colour matched powdercoat was used frequently.

Mackay Base HospitalThe Alucobond system was a complete design and install. Many aspects of the Alucobond system, shrouds and perforated screens were designed specifically for use in the hospital redevelopment. The solutions were obtained by co-ordination with other parties involved with the project, as well as using the extensive knowledge base and depth of experience within G.James.

Looking Ahead

The close working relationship between Baulderstone and G.James was critical in helping deliver the project. The final stage of construction is due to start July 2013 which will include the remainder of building Q and the whole of building A.

Reducing Noise with the Right Windows

Acoustics should be an important consideration when building your home.Australia’s growing population has resulted in a shift towards higher density residential and commercial constructions. In order to satisfy the expectations of the occupants, the acoustic performance of the construction and its openings requires careful consideration. This post is aimed to provide a general understanding of what options are available to increase the acoustic resistance of glazing.

Understanding Acoustic Ratings

Weighted Sound Reduction Index (Rw)

Road traffic is one source of unwelcome noise.
image courtesy of ziptrivia

Rw is the current Australian and ISO Standard acoustic rating method – AS/NZS 1276.1 1999 & ISO 717 1996. Designed to estimate the acoustic performance of a material or construction for certain common sound insulation problems. It contains two sound adaption terms (Ct and Ctr) so that the Rw value can be modified to reflect the environmental conditions to which the element or construction will be subjected. The Ct or Ctr term is added to the calculated Rw value to provide an indication of the performance under the adjusted sound condition.

Ct “Pink Noise” Spectrum Adaption Term.

Ct is used to adjust Rw to compensate for noise sources such as: high-speed traffic, children playing, noise from radios TV’s, high speed railway traffic and from factories that emit medium and high frequency noise.

Ctr “Traffic Noise” Spectrum Adaption Term.

Ctr used to adjust Rw to compensate for noise sources such as: low speed urban road traffic, factories that emit low / medium frequency noise and aircraft at close range.

Methods to improve acoustic (Rw) ratings

1) Decreasing the amount and volume of direct transmission paths through the glazing.

There is little point spending lots of money on upgrading to a high performance glass product if the window frame and seals are not upgraded. Air tightness of the window construction in particular, has been experimentally proven to be the most cost effective method of improving the Rw value of a window. This because each opening in the window, frame and seals provides a direct transmission path for sound to pass through. By reducing the number and area of these paths more sound must pass through the ‘barrier’ ie. the glass improving the overall performance of the system.

It should be noted that in some products the introduction of tighter fitting seals will reduce the overall day to day servicabilty of the product. For example – a sliding window may become difficult to slide due to the requirement to increase the size of the seal. In these cases it may be better to look for an alternative solution.

Frequency spectra for 4mm, 6mm and 12mm Float
Glass showing how the coincidence dip occurs at
different frequencies for each glass thickness.

2) Increasing the thickness of the glass

Thicker glass vibrates less than thinner glass, consequently the amount of sound able to pass through the window is reduced. Unfortunately this increase in glass thickness is limited by a phenomenon known as the ‘coincidence dip’. The coincidence dip is a frequency range over which the transmission of the sound increases through a material. The location of the coincidence dip is dependent on the material’s weight and its inherent stiffness. If not for this phenomenon, thickening the width of the glass would be the solution to all window acoustic problems.

3) Moving from a monolithic to a laminated glass construction

The effect of lamination on the sound insulation of glass.
Note the coincidence dip for solid glass is virtually
non-existent for laminated glass.

Laminated glass consists of two (or sometimes more) sheets of glass bonded together with a plastic interlayer. This plastic interlayer provides a damping mechanism in the glazing (the interlayer actually absorbs vibrational energy). This damping mechanism is particularly effective over the coincidence dip in the transmission spectrum. The result is that the coincidence dip is minimized and the overall performance is increased. A somewhat recent advance in laminated glass has been the development of ‘acoustic’ interlayers. These have been specifically designed to further reduce the coincidence dip, which maximizes the performance possible at each construction thickness.

4) Changing to an Insulated Glass Unit (IGU) Construction

Insulated Glass Units (IGU) consists of two glass sheets separated by a spacer to form an air gap between the sheets. This allows each glass sheet in the unit to act as a separate barrier to the transmission of sound. Unfortunately the spacer separating the sheets effectively forms a small short-circuit in the system. The spacer itself provides a direct path for the sound vibrations to be transmitted from the external glass sheet to the internal sheet of the IGU. This short circuit could obviously be eliminated by removing the spacer. This is not however a viable option – it would directly result in condensation in the IGU as well as allowing dust and particulates to deposit onto the internal faces of the two glass sheets.

Very large air gaps are more effective at reducing sound transfer than smaller air gaps. In practice, increasing the air gap from 6mm to 12mm provides little benefit. Substantially increasing the air gap to over 90mm however provides a large increase sound reduction. This anomaly is due to air trapped inside the unit acting as sound transfer mechanism between the glass faces of the IGU. As the air gap approaches 90mm this effect decreases in its severity.

Conclusion

There are numerous approaches that can be used to improve the sound resistance of a glazing and more often than not the most appropriate solution is a combination of one or more of the methods listed above. G.James has conducted extensive acoustic testing on our windows and doors. For further information on the choosing the right product for your project, please contact us.

Cairns Botanic Gardens Visitor Centre

Visitor Centre, Cairns Botanic Gardens

The new visitor centre at Cairns Botanical Gardens is quite literally a reflection of the tropical beauty of far north Queensland.

A ten minute drive from the centre of Cairns, the Botanic Gardens are a great place to unwind, and the new visitor information centre is the place to start.

Visitor Information Centre

The new visitor information centre is a $4.6 million dollar project to revamp the facility and provide an iconic new gateway into the gardens.

Designed by Charles Wright Architects and constructed by Hansen Yuncken, the building is a mixed use building, divided into two “wings” separated by a breezeway. One wing houses visitor facilities such as a cafe, gift store and auditorium, while the other functions as office space for council staff and includes a meeting room and administrative facilities.

On Friday 16th November 2012 the National MBA Awards were held in Canberra. The Cairns Botanic Garden Visitor Centre was awarded the National Commercial Construction ($5 million to $10 million) National MBA 2012 Award.

Green Building

Visitor Centre, Cairns Botanic Gardens Printed WallOne of the primary goals of the building was to be “green”, in order to complement the gardens. To achieve this a number of technologies and techniques were incorporated into the design.

A big focus was placed on environmentally sustainable design (or ESD). This includes a number of green features such as thermal/solar chimneys which allow convection ventilation and also provide natural light inside the building.

The building also features water collection for reuse in both the building and gardens, and a thermal mass system to passively cool the environment and reduce dependence on active cooling systems such as air conditioners.

In addition, the visitors wing includes glass stacking doors which fold up completely to allow maximum airflow and open the facility directly onto the gardens.

Mirrored Windows & Printed Glass

Visitor Centre, Cairns Botanic Gardens ShopThe most notable aspect of the project is the use of mirrors to reflect images of the lush gardens and blend the facility into its surroundings. This was achieved with a reflective film applied to the glass.

The lower level windows have artwork printed on the glass using a digital ceramic printing process. This complements the mirrored glass and brings an aesthetic quality both indoors and out.

Cairns Botanic Gardens

The Cairns Botanic Gardens area includes the Flecker Gardens, Centenary Lakes, Mt. Whitfield Conservation Park and the Tanks Art Centre. The newly constructed visitor centre offers a great way to explore the area and facilitate community activities, through the auditorium and locally sourced gift shop.

The new visitor centre was completed in late 2011 and is open to the public 7 days a week, excluding public holidays.

Choosing the right windows and doors for your climate

Windows and Doors to match your climate

Windows provide light, fresh air and great views to the outside world, but they can also be a major source of heat transfer, making your home unbearably hot in summer and freezing cold in winter.

Recent advances in glazing materials have improved the performance of windows to the extent where choosing energy efficient windows can prevent heat transfer, significantly reducing your energy costs and make your home noticeably more comfortable.

Different climates across Australia

Australia has 8 zones ranging from hot (zone 1) to cold (zone 8).Australia has a diverse range of climates. The National Construction Code divides Australia into eight different climate zones. These climate zones can be grouped more broadly into three climate categories, which describe the predominant conditions in the area:

  • Hot Climate (zones 1, 2 & 3)
  • Mixed Climate (zones 4 & 5)
  • Cold Climate (zones 6, 7 & 8)

Hot Climate

In hot climates, cooling your home and preventing heat gain is a high priority. When choosing windows, look for types with a lower solar heat gain coefficient (SHGCw) and those that provide good ventilation such as G.James 050 Series louvres. Choose products glazed with a tinted glass or one of the high performance products from the G.James SOLECT® range.

Cold Climate

In colder climates, heating your home and preventing heat loss is the priority. Heat loss during the cooler, winter months can be reduced by installing window types with a lower U-value. Choose products that are double glazed such as G.James Twin-Glaze or ecoTHERM insulated glass units (IGUs) or one of the high performance products from the G.James SOLECT® range. Maximise the passive solar gain by choosing a glass eg clear, which has a high solar heat gain.

Mixed Climate

In a mixed climate both heating and cooling your home are important, so consider which of these is the primary concern. Depending on whether you’re looking to focus on heating or cooling, you should refer to the relevant recommendations above. If neither heating nor cooling is the priority, choose a window with a lower U-value and a mid-range solar heat gain to provide good year round performance.

Heating/Cooling Stars

You can find cooling and heating stars against all our window products in the professional centre of gjames.com.

Between 46%-61% of a home’s heating energy can be lost through windows, while  79%-86% of heat can be gained. Therefore improving the thermal performance of a window can massively reduce energy costs and greenhouse gas emissions. WERS (Window Energy Rating Scheme) rates the energy impact of residential windows in Australia. Energy efficiency of windows is rated using the WERS heating/cooling star system.

  • Cooling stars measure a window’s ability to retain heat within the home.
  • Heating stars measure the ability of a window to reduce the amount of heat gained from sunlight.

The aim of WERS is to help home builders and home owners evaluate the relative energy (heating and cooling) performance of different types of windows by rating that performance in terms of stars. Having no stars indicates a very poor performing window while ten stars signifies superior performance.

G.James provides a comprehensive WERS search for all G.James window products. It can be found in the professional centre of gjames.com.

Other Heating & Cooling Factors

Windows with large opening areas maximise opportunity for ventilation and cooling, but larger areas can reduce energy efficiency. Installing an awning or a sunshade over a window will reduce the impact of solar heat gain, and effective window configuration can also improve seasonal efficiency. Knowledge of these factors will help you make an informed choice, but an experienced local glazing professional can also help you devise a solution to suit both your preferences and local conditions.

Project Update: Hamilton Harbour

The third stage of the Hamilton Harbour development is now under construction.

Situated on the north shore of Brisbane River just a few kilometres outside the CBD, Hamilton Harbour is an exciting mixed use development with excellent city views up the river.

The project is designed by Cox Rayner Architects and is a joint venture between developers Devine Limited and Leighton Properties.

The Project

The first stages of the project saw two residential buildings constructed, both of which have been fully completed with residents already moved in. The final stage will see an additional residential tower and up to two commercial buildings built on the site.

The first two residential towers, Harbour One and Harbour Two, are 22 and 19 stories respectively. They were constructed simultaneously and completed in November 2011.

The third stage commenced as these buildings neared completion, when construction of Riverside Hamilton, a twenty storey residential tower began.

The first commercial office building, named “KSD” after the adjacent Kingsford Smith Drive, is 5 levels high and presently under construction.

G.James has been working to supply windows, doors, shop fronts and façade glazing for all four of the present buildings.

Reducing Traffic Noise

While energy efficiency is one of the most important factors in the design of a building, given the close proximity to busy Kingsford Smith Drive careful attention has been taken to achieve a high standard of acoustic performance as well.

To achieve these ends, a number of high performance products have been incorporated into the design.

  1. The 550 Series Balcony is a glass and aluminium balcony, which offers stunning views but also helps protect from the elements.Apartments with sliding doors incorporate the G.James 445 series sliding door system, and are glazed with IGUs for their sound deadening properties. The fixed windows use the 451 and the higher rated 651 series pocket framing systems, also both designed for accommodating IG units.
  2. Alfresco bi-fold doors in the apartments use the 477 series bi-fold door, with a 550 series glass balustrade on the balconies for excellent views.
  3. The ground floors of the residential buildings have been glazed using the 650/850 series shop front glazing system.

Acoustic performance was particularly important for apartments on the road side of Riverside Hamilton.  In these apartments an acoustic door arrangement was used to achieve excellent noise isolation, comprising a 445 series external sliding door with a 245 series internal sliding door.

Construction

The simultaneous construction of Harbour One & Two initially posed some challenges for the G.James Eagle Farm factory, as it was already working on two other high rises at the time. To cope with the demand, the work was spread between the Kingsford Smith Drive and Gold Coast factories to deliver results on time.

At present, construction on Riverside Hamilton is wrapping up and work is well under way on the commercial KSD building. G.James has commenced work installing frames for the ground floor shop front, and will be installing the curtain wall façade in the coming months.

G.James is pleased to have been working very closely with Devine on this project to achieve the desired outcomes, and look forward to further developing our working relationship. Stay tuned for the final article and more photos of the finished project.

5 key points for choosing windows & doors

Choosing Windows and Doors

On average, glass comprises around 25% of a home’s external surface. Along with providing light, ventilation and protection from the elements, this makes choosing the right windows and doors one of the most important decisions when building a home.

These five key points highlight some important aspects to consider when selecting the supplier of windows and doors in your new home.

Australian Window Association

Compliance & Certification

Is your window supplier an Australian Window Association (AWA) member?

The AWA Product Accreditation Program ensures that accredited members manufacture their windows and doors to exacting performance criteria.

AWA members are also required to produce windows and doors which meet the requirements of all relevant Australian Standards are subject to third party annual audits to ensure continuing compliance.

More information on the benefits of dealing with an AWA member can be found on the AWA website.

Colour Selection

Aluminium Colour Range

Choice of frame colour can be an effective tool in either complementing or contrasting your interior and/or exterior colour schemes.

Aluminium windows can be ordered in either powder coated (painted) or anodised finishes offering you a wide selection of colours. An example of typical colours available in anodized and powder coated aluminium can be found in the G.James Colour selector.

Your chosen finish must also be able to withstand exposure to the elements, so a reputable supplier will provide a guarantee against premature weathering of surface finishes.

Glass Selection

The correct glass selection can offer a number of benefits.

  • Reduced external noise.
  • Savings on heating and/or cooling costs.
  • Extending the life of soft furnishings.
  • Reducing glare.
  • Improving security.

The basic type of glass used depends on application – in areas where accidental impacts are a concern, toughened and laminated glass are much stronger and safer than regular annealed glass. Using annealed glass in areas where the extra strength is not of tangible benefit is however more economical.

Climate is another major factor in the selection of glass – in warmer climates toned or coated glass will offer performance benefits, whilst in cooler climates IGUs (double glazing) will improve heat retention.

The most suitable products for a home will vary on a number of factors, so you should speak to a professional to discuss your requirements.

Features and Benefits

Price should not be the only consideration in seletion of windows and doors – value should also be assessed in terms of the extra features and long term benefits offered by the product.

So before deciding on who will supply your windows, ask the following questions:

  • Does the window have a rigid PVC sill insert for weather performance and easy cleaning of the sill? A threshold (cover) in the door sill should also be present.
  • Are the flyscreens easily removed both internally and externally? This is an important feature, particularly for two storey homes.
  • Are window handles located in the centre? Handles located at the jamb (side) can be difficult to access behind curtains or operate when fully opened.
  • Do the window rollers contain stainless steel bearings, important for long term performance?
  • Are the window rollers of sufficient size? Smaller tyres can develop flat spots which causes the roller to skid along the track rather than roll.
  • Are the rollers height adjustable?

After Sales Service

In the event of faults with sliding windows, doors or associated hardware, you must be able to rely upon your supplier to rectify any issues.

A written warranty from a trustworthy and well established company gives you peace of mind of knowing that you won’t be left out of pocket if something does go wrong. It is necessary to read and understand your warranty agreement to know the conditions under which you are covered.

It is also important to choose a supplier who offers a stable product line with standardised features and parts across their products – you don’t want to be left with non-functional windows or doors because the supplier can no longer obtain the right parts. A supplier must also keep sufficient stock/parts on hand in order to rectify faults quickly.

Ask an Expert

Researching your window and door options will help you make an informed choice, but don’t hesitate to consult with an expert for help in selecting the ideal windows and doors.

An experienced local glazing professional will help you tailor a solution to suit both your preferences and local conditions.